I’ve written a lot about ideas.  Beliefs and truths.  Points of view and facts.  Breaking those down and knowing which is which has become an increasingly difficult task of late.  Given how quickly our government and media is degrading into an Orwellian/1984 propaganda machine, the ability to differentiate fact and fiction has become a harder one to master.

Part of this comes from the various aspects of my personal life and experiences, but it does go all the way to the leaders of our government.  It is important to realize how far we go to convince ourselves of things we know aren’t true.  And how challenging it can be to find deeper understandings and truths in a lot of the ideas we cling to.

Listening to Donald Trump talk about Coal, I have to wonder if he really has this business savvy that he claims.  Coal is an industry who’s time has passed.  For decades it has made up a tiny percentage of our energy production, steadily decreasing every year as we come up with cleaner and more efficient ways to power our country.  To my knowledge, this is generally accepted.  So how is it good business to keep an industry that makes up a tiny percentage of our energy production on life support when we’ve already got better ways to do it?

And more local, the solar panels my uncle had considered putting in the old farm land.  He and my father had worked out a deal with a solar panel company, and things were moving in that direction.  Then the town select board meeting came up.  My aunt decided to attend and voiced some strong opposition to it.  Rather than get involved in a potential domestic dispute, the solar company passed on putting panels there.  Personal politics aside–I’m all for solar panels and was actually somewhat impressed that my uncle wanted to go this route–I would say my aunt’s choices in this matter show a lack of understanding of the situation.  Both her and my uncle being in their sixties and had some relatively recent health issues, so how much longer do they plan on farming?  Because they are not making that much money and will likely have to sell off the land and animals in the relatively near future.  In a sense I actually thought my uncle was making a smart decision in acknowledging that farming was not a long term plan by itself.

Paris Accords are on my mind so that is kind of where I’m starting with this, mostly because it parlay the point I’m trying to make about how we struggle to understand and accept truth.  There’s a lot about that just screams a refusal to understand these fundamental truths about our world, our economy and our future.

In general, I feel like there is a disconnect between the world we perceive and the world as it is.  In writing about relationships, this is something I’ve noticed frequently as much as it is prevalent in politics and economics and other areas.  We’re conditioned into accepting truths without questioning or truly understanding them.

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Speaking Truth

February 10, 2017

I was reading something the other day about how Tom Perez and his bungling a comment about last year’s Democratic Primary.  He acknowledged that the primary process was rigged against Bernie Sanders in favor of Hillary Clinton and that the next DNC Chair Person would have to be “honest” and “transparent” to succeed.  Then he essentially retracted the statement, stating that he “misspoke”.  Or rather the party elders and establishment got wind of it and voiced their disapproval.  Cue the groaning and eye-rolling.  He was right the first time.

I’m trying to be a little less political, but this article I read kind of fits with my general train of thought on a number of matters.  Our whole political system needs an influx of new ideas.  Why do you think Bernie Sanders, the Green Party and the Libertarian Party had such a significant impact on the election last year?  However, those ideas cannot be expected to flourish if truth cannot be acknowledged.

One of the overarching themes I’ve tried to deal with in my writing this blog has been the “Idea of Ideas” and how important it is to always embrace new ideas and information.  When it comes to truth, I often quote Obi-Wan Kenobi from Return of the Jedi.  In explaining his misleading account of what happened to Luke’s father, Kenobi states that “Many of the Truths we cling to depend greatly on our own point of view.”  I keep throwing that line out there, but it is a good line.

Ideas were a focus of mine here, but how we regard those ideas is also worth looking at.  Truth and belief can be subjective, but they can inspire ideas.  I will admit that something I’ve struggled with is knowing when to challenge people’s truths and ideas.  Where the lines are drawn.  I have disregarded a myriad of them, but sometimes that needs to happen too.  Although I would hope my writing here does occasionally inspire people to look at their beliefs, ideas and truths from a different perspective, I don’t claim absolute authority on right or wrong here.  I’m sure there a number of opinions on that.  I simply hope I challenged some truths and some new ideas came as a result of them.  Even if it is just an expanded perception, I think it would be a benefit.

Regardless of the situation, ideas and truth need to be challenged.

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